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frequently find numerous media outlets and has written for quite a few of the major u.s. newspapers in the area or in these areas of his expertise. he is extremely knowledgeable man as seen things happen and comments on them in my humble opinion in a reasonable and accurate way. he will be followed by doc or robert freedman who is the meyer hall pearl pearl storm professor of political science at baltimore hebrew university and a visiting professor of political science at johns hopkins university. he has been a consultant to the u.s. department of state and central intelligence agency and he is the author of four books, soviet foreign-policy and also the editor and has been the editor of 14 books on israel and middle eastern policy. and then our third speaker will be dr. stephen blank the strategic study institutes expert on soviet lock and post-soviet world since 1989. he is the editor of imperial decline in russia's changing position in asia and coeditor of the soviet military in the future, and the last speaker is dr. ariel cohen my colleague at heritage who is the senior fellow
between the u.s., russia and syria. a pal discuss the syrian support of the -- a panel discusses russian support of the syrian civil war. this is about an hour and a half. >> we welcome all of you joining us on heritage foundation and on c-span. we ask that you turn off yourself funds as we begin recording for the benefit of today's program. the we will post for everyone's future reference. hosting our discussion today is dr. steven bucci. his focus is special operations and cyber security. he commanded the third battalion fifth special forces and also became the military assistant to donald rumsfeld. at his retirement, -- prior to joining us, he was a leading consultant on cyber security. please welcome the in -- join me in welcoming steven bucci. [applause] >> we have a very timely subjects to discuss, and i think we have a great panel of experts that will be doing be discussing to get us started. i have been interested in this because one of the first things i did was testified before congress about the weapons of mass destruction threat that syria and the somewhat untimely demise mig
violent death. a 24 year u.s. special forces veteran, wood's job was to try to prevent such an attack from occurring. >> does it make you mad? >> that was my first reaction when i heard ambassador stevens had been killed. i was angry. >> why did you come forward? >> i was had at the hub of everything going on there some of the information needs to come forward. >> we begin our story in the winter of 2011 a year before wood arrives in libya. colonel moammar khaddafy is in power in tripoli. they are gaining rocontrol over much of libya. february 25th the u.s. state department withdraws all of its personnel from the capital. but six weeks later april 5th, 2011, it sends stevens with a 12 man team by charter boat to benghazi now under rebel control. as special representative to the rebels, stevens set up shop in a hotel. june 1st, 2011, a car bomb explodes in the parking lot in front of that hotel. stevens and his team decide it's too ding russ to stay the-- dano stay there. they settled on a compound west of the city. >> it was a resident from an owner who had a nice villa and several other b
saddam hussein. that only happened because of the u.s. invasion of iraq. but then even after the u.s. invasion and the toppling of hussein -- pusan -- a secular liberal government that was willing to cede some of its sovereign rights to a foreign power. some claim it's all different now with the islamic republic because the arab awakening, the demonstration effect will work together with sanctions to find the break the back of the islamic republic. but this ignores the fact that the islamic republic sees the arab awakening as hugely positive, hugely positive. iranian policymakers and analysts believe that any arab government, any arab government that becomes at all more representative of its populations beliefs, concerns and policy preferences will, by definition, be less enthusiastic about strategic cooperation with the united states, let alone with israel, and more open to iran's message of foreign policy independence. what policy elites here ms., is the islamic republic does not need governments to be more pro-iranian. that's not what they need. they just need these governments to
and virtually assure thad the treasury bond markets will lose patience with the u.s. congress and within two-five years and you will get a snap back and negative reaction from the treasury market who may not buy our u.s. bonds in force. there is a lot of feelings in the bond markets and laid back world coming to the u.s. as a safe haven. but jamie diamond saying that the u.s. can't borrow indefinitely . you don't the treasury market do your fiscal work for you. you don't want the fiscal discipline done for you. >> it is said only adult in town and doing something childish in the process. lizzie, it is ridiculous. thank you very much. star of fox business network. you don't get you should demand because your fiscal future depends on it. she mentioned jamie diamond. he is considered one of the brains was wall street and putting couple million dollars aside in just a case sceniar just in case it hits the fan. not if that will come in handy if there is a melt down. he's telling you he's girding for the storm. you should remember that. he said oh, this is the six billion bad trade? i want to remi
mentioned before, one of the surprises in the report was how vulnerable the u.s. is still, despite the massive shale oil resolution -- revolution. this is not to say that the progress towards energy independence has not provided measurable gains in energy security and reducing volatility, but it is still there. even in a hypothetical world where the u.s. has not become completely self-sufficient in oil. oil markets are completely integrated and we will drive up prices everywhere, including the u.s.. so, while having diversified fuel diversifies away from oil into natural gas and all of this stuff, we will definitely see benefits. it is not a silver bullet that will completely solve the problem. >> steve, i want to go back to you. they were making your point. >> it is about what to do in a situation with ambiguity. my personal opinion, that is the most likely scenario for the iranians. maybe not over the long term, but certainly over the near term. >> next 10 years, perhaps? >> there are historical precedents for that. south africa actually has six nuclear weapons. they never tested
the chairman of the house of endangering several libyans who have been working with the u.s. by not giving their names when he released 166 pages unclassified libya documents. heading tomorrow night's foreign policy debate are, i have to say, more confusing to me as a consumer of news than they have ever been. we talked about this early on. i will put myself in the category of people who were troubled. category of people who were troubled by what seemed to be a distance between what the reporting and what the intelligence agency seemed to be saying and what was coming out of the white house. i thought that gab was worrisome. we talked about it on the show. i don't know what to think anymore because what looked like it first was officially the u.s. government line was this was spontaneous and in reaction to the video. there was a parallel channel of reporting indicating it was premeditated, the work of al qaeda militants and had nothing to do with the video. there was no protest in the video. that is what happened. now we have reporting from the l.a. times and "the new york times" talking t
start" begins now. >>> it came out warning. riveting new details of the attack in libya that killed a u.s. ambassador, a different story than we were told. >>> a battle over big bird. shout out to both candidates on the campaign trail, now sesame street is saying stop! >>> racial balance under the microscope of the supreme court. justices argue today over affirmative action and college admissions. big "newsday" here. good morning, welcome to "early start. "i'm john berman. >> i'm zoraida sambolin. the state department is giving its most detailed account of the speed, severity and calculation behind last month's attack on the u.s. mission in benghazi in libya. the house oversight committee will weigh in on security failings during a hearing scheduled for later today. the state department saying the attack was not a spontaneous offshoot of protest and saying u.s. and security personnel in benghazi were outmanned and no reasonable security presentation could have fended off the assault. u.s. ambassador christopher stephens and three others were killed in the attack. arwa damon helps peace to
sandy is expected to pack a huge punch when it hits the u.s. forecasts call for the storm to return it hurricane strength and while the timing and location of sandy's landfall is unclear, people are bracing along the eastern seaboard. governors in new york, pennsylvania, maryland, they've issued states of emergency while the limited state of emergency is in effect for maine. >>> meanwhile, the governor of delaware is prepared mandatory evacuations if sandy remains on its current path and in nearby virginia 300 national guardsmen could put on recovery efforts after sandy passes through that state. for those of you traveling this weekend, sandy is certainly going to have an impact. several airlines are announcing they will change their fees. >>> meteorologist alexandria steele joins us now. we're talking about maine and maryland and where is the storm now? >> maine to miami beach. you're talking about airport delays and cancellations and you could think of tens of millions being impacted. boston, new york, washington, dulles, reagan national. i mean, every major airport on the eastern
joining us on booktv is professor brendan doherty of the u.s. naval academy. his most recent book is called "the rise of the president's permanent campaign". professor doherty, who was packard bell? >> guest: very good question. first, thanks for having me on. i might be in your program. pat caddell was an adviser to president-elect jimmy carter and he is noted for coining that transition memo he wrote to then president-elect carter, in which he said the key to being effective as president is a continuing political campaign. the notion was born man and popularized by book on political consultants when a teen 80s that has since become part of the common lexicon. >> host: how it should defend campaign? >> guest: it can be defined broadly or narrowly. the way i define as the extent to which a president focuses on electoral concerns throughout his term in office. by focusing the same presidential fundraising, and dedication to key electoral states to register them in office and the nature of electoral decision-making within the white house itself in recent administration. some people
americans. the bomber drove into a nato patrol. doug mcelway joins us live. it was a couple weeks ago the u.s. suspended patrols with afghan soldiers because of these insider attacks. have these joint patrols resumed now? >> reporter: they have. they resumed last thursday and the insider attacks have also resumed. not only the attack you just mentioned but also the suicide bomber attack, homicide bomber attack. the motorcycle laden with explosives drove into that marketplace. critics say this attacks reflect an obama foreign policy that refuses to acknowledge the reality on the ground. u.s. marines are tying tourniquets to their legs in hopes of surviving ied attacks before they go out on patrol. >> we are going to get after this. it reverit. it reverberates. we are willing to sacrifice a lot for this campaign but we are not willing to be murdered for it. >> reporter: the death toll reached 2,000 over the weekend. martha: what is the afghan point of view as far as we can glean about these insider attacks? >> reporter: critics say the obama administration has set a date for withdrawal extra. >
this is what works better in the u.s. however, having put the contentious idea in the table for all you people do care to shed, the reason i bring it out as i couldn't find polling data, but when i talk to tea party people, i would ask them point blank, so what if you could get very large reductions in spending than the prices that were so modest increase in taxes. would you take that question does not get deficits and government as a result. and they all said no. they were more allergic to raising taxes than they were to have in the government grow, which i thought was surprising. he saw that same dynamic by the way the republican primary debate. >> i think that's a great point you actually have seen polling data, but my interviews also cannot they typically will be shown as one person in particular said he actually would favor some sort of compromise there if it were guaranteed that the spending decreases would actually go into effect and typically at the reluctance to any kind of tax increase at all was because experience has suggested to them that tax increase is due in go into effect and
for the valerie plain unfair and again in the u.s. attorney scandal, said my 22 million e-mails were deleted and these are all government documents and they have never been found. so that was one thing he seems to have gotten away with. another thing was in 2004, smart tag played a central role in the presidential election. the secretary of each state, a part of their job is to oversee an impartial election. you may recall kathleen harris in florida was secretary of state of florida and she also haven't played a central role in the bush election and there is considerable controversy over that. well, a very similar thing happened in ohio in 2004, where ken blackwell was secretary of state. and again, he was supposed to oversee a fair and impartial election. but he happened to be cochaired the bush cheney reelection committee. he decided to tabulate the return for the 2004 election was secretary of state's computers weren't enough than they needed to get another set of computer service. so who did he go to both smart tack. smart tax roll raises an amount of very interesting questions. i went t
parts of the country. in rural helmand province u.s. marines told us there aren't enough afghan army soldiers to take over. in one case, when the afghans did take over this base in the east, the commander and his men deserted. the u.s. army had to come back. >> you're relying on us to do your security far you, y'all need to be participating in this security. >> reporter: but much of the training has been put in jeopardy by the recent rise of insider attacks-- afghan soldiers turning their guns on their american partners. major matthew kessler is a logistics advisor at camp leatherneck. how has it been here? you work with afghans everyday. >> it's a concern. it's frustrating for both sides. it makes the marines angry and it makes the afghans angry. >> pelley: kelly cobiella is at our cbs news bureau in kabul and, kelly, i wonder what nato is saying about what happens when u.s. troops withdraw and the afghans are left to fend for themselves. >> reporter: well, nato is painting a very rosy picture on paper. they say afghan national security forces are on track to take over security in t
the same capacities to attack the u.s. homeland and our allies as they did four years ago. >> let's go to the next segment because it's a very important one. it is the rise of china and future challenges for america. i want to just begin this by asking both of you and, mr. president, you go first this time. what do you believe is the greatest future threat to the national security of this country? >> well, i think it will continue to be terrorist networks. we have to remain vigilant as i just said. but with respect to china, china is both an adversary but also a potential partner in the international community if it's following the rules. so my attitude coming into office was that we are going to insist that china plays by the same rules as everybody else. now, i know americans had seen jobs being shipped overseas, businesses and workers not getting a level playing field when it came to trade. and that's the reason why i set up a trade task force to it go after cheaters when it came to international trade. that's the reason why we have brought more cases against china for violating tra
we know well, in which the candidates attracted to a u.s. and new hampshire, and they submit their feet to the will of the people. and in a series of primaries and caucuses they are the chairs and nominees are selected. before jimmy carter, presidential candidates were chosen by insiders at the national conventions. and they could run in the primaries and the caucus but they didn't necessarily have to. it was an inside game. presidents now must raise a lot of money to take their money to their case to the people in the way that they didn't need to before. and in terms of the travel and the president's focusing on the key states, you have presidents now who are key to the political success taking their case to the people and now that you're in the office, they have continued to do so as president.o in the book i talk about examples of the presidential aide saying when a president needs to get back to his winning a game or does he want to do? he wants to go back to the people and the have and to do it in the key electoral states that better disproportionately in the coming ele
to the u.s. program. this woman lost two sons to "fast and furious" guns. >> they feel helpless. they don't know what to do. we interview one of them and they say, who is going to pay for this? >> reporter: it could be the u.s. government, should the family of border agent brian terry prevail in their wrongful death claim. >> the people can go and sue in the united states with american lawyers that would be a very interesting development certainly. >> reporter: for its part the mexican government has remained largely silent, unwilling to criticize its northern neighbor. >> our political elites only worried about obtaining the next position and they and benefits they obtain being in politics. >> reporter: now univision aired its one hour special last night. it alleged that the u.s. ran a second gun-running operation, castaway out of tampa, that knowingly supplied guns to cartels in colombia and honduras. the sad part of this, gregg, out of 2000 guns in "fast and furious" we can only account for about 800. so the karnage will continue for years to come. gregg: a lot of guns remaining out th
debates. i personally admire their work. the u.s. is much more diverse than that. >> were you angry? were you hurt? >> we don't want to be invisible. we are not invisible. we are making sure that even with an accent that people hear what we're saying. yes, of course. >> we are mainstreaming. you try to separate us from ethnic media and mainstream media. we are mainstream media. we compete directly with abc, nbc and cbs. in many states we have higher ratings. the difference between us and them, it's under the same category, is the language. we transmit in a different language, however, now we're changing that. >> what do you mean? >> we're changing that now because now we have the joint venture with abc and we are going to be doing the same thing that we're doing but do it in english so we can make sure we have all the market. the special thing about that is it's not only for that sector of latinos who is more english dominant and prefers to speak english, but i think it actually contributes to the society and to democracy in this country so that everyone who speaks english in this country
political panel weighs in. >> rick: remembering a fallen border patrol hero, the u.s. homeland security secretary making an emotional visit to nicholas ivie's family today. >> arthel: hard to believe, the holiday shopping rush is just around the corner. amazing products that might make santa's list. the first, governor mitt romney is set to speak at a campaign rally near orlando, minutes from now. and you are now looking at live pictures from the rally, amphitheater and meanwhile, earlier in the day, his wife, ann was greeted with kind words, by supporters at an orlando campaign office. >> i really believe, that your husband is going to be, i think that he will have as much impact as ronald reagan, if not more. >> he'll do better than ronald reagan. >> i felt that for a long time, so... >> arthel: carl cameron is live in apopka, florida where the governor is set to take the stage, fund-raising news from both campaigns, carl? >> reporter: that's right, may be a while before we see governor romney, it is lightning country in florida and the campaign's arrival is delayed because of fear th
a nuclear strike capability against the western hemisphere. >> do you ambassadors denied the u.s.s.r. has placed and is placing medium and intermediate range missiles and sites? a yes or no? do not wait for the translation. yes or no? >> 13 days in 1962, live sunday from the jfk presidential library and museum, on the anniversary of the cuban missile crisis. >> two counter-terrorism experts said the obama administration use of ground strikes may be undermining security objectives in places like yemen and pakistan. peter bird and and christopher swift discuss the move from partitive killings to signature strikes, which target groups ahead of men associated with terrorists. according to research, and grown strikes in pakistan have increased from one every 40 days during the bush administration to one every four days. this is from the center for national policy. >> good afternoon. my name is gregory aftandilian. i am a senior fellow for the middle east here at the center for national policy. on behalf of our chairman, and our president, i want to welcome all of you here today. i also want to
it will be deprived of a historical fiscal and financial resource. the u.s. would be forced to try to support tripoli's attempts to assert central north other the entirety of the state, but i think the u.s. would find itself -- its libyan interlocutors unwilling or unable to help the u.s. or to advance u.s. agendas. and at the same time you could have a hulking, inintroverted, disinterested, disengaged algeria right next door. and this would be a very negative she their yore for the entirety of north africa. but i'm perpetually the optimist, and i don't like the chick l little role. i think there are a lot of chicken littles here in d.c., and the sky's always falling. so what if in the happy circumstance none of these scenarios come to pass. where does the u.s. fit in? i think there's a real potential for the u.s. to build new relationships with algeria. it's going to have to be predicated on algeria being in the driver's seat. algeria will never be anybody's proxy. algeria has enormous potential that i think the u.s. can help it realize both domestically and economically. if algeria manages the poli
. and the u.s.' counterterrorism policies in north africa are highly unpopular. so we need to get better and smarter about how we do counterterrorism, and i think a big piece of it is economic. counterterrorism, i don't know how much it's shifted because they were really smart about it early on, but then the resources put sort of more on the military side even though it tried to be more socioeconomic early on. i think the we need a much more holistic approach to counterterrorism. >> thank you, dr. alexander, for your question. i think that one of the reasons for this situation in northern mali is precisely the issue of refugees. i happen to have recorded some of the what happened, i mean, as a spawn of libya, of what happened already since the return of the, of the tuaregs who were serving in thegy gaze under gadhafi. in may 284,000 fled northern mali. about 60,000 went to -- [inaudible] 61,000 went to mauritania. you were talking about the neighborhood, what's going on. algeria, i think, has 15,000 or 20,000. so if the situation if there is an intervention, you know, as the french are w
, episodic and sheriff's race someplace is probably more likely to be stolen then presidential or senator u.s. house race. >> what trace would that be, charlie? let's talk about that. >> i think it's sort of a solution in search of a problem. but i don't -- i think a lot -- i think a lot of the republican concerns are very, very insear but the florida situation, florida republican party, i mean these kinds of things happen on both sides but i don't think it's -- i don't think there's a huge problem but at the same time, you know, in life most of us need i.d.'s to go about our daily lives and i think we ought to try to do something to get photo i.d.'s, official photo i.d.'s in the hands of voters to help them get to their lives up to and including voting. but anyway -- one last, i will throw a last question to the guys. >> thanks. looking back at the 2004 election and strategy president bush and his team implored, when you look at the cycle, we know it will be a close race. what i see on the ground game is the obama campaign thinking and really planning on the field a lot more than governor ro
progress within cities? where in the u.s.? >> we can point to smarter transportation and public safety and health care. that is not necessarily a smarter city. a smarter city, and it was alluded to a number of times this morning, is a city of the complex group of systems. how do you take advantage of the integration of those systems. this is where we are lacking. take a building. you can have a building and you can implement the best building information management system that exists in the world. then you can implement the best physical security system in the world. you be doing pretty well. there is an opportunity there to even better your operation by integrating the two. think of the additional insight you could game and have you could run and manage the building more effectively. the same principle holds true for a city. why are we lagging other countries? sometimes we cannot get out of our own way. it is the way we are organized. it is the way we make decisions that it's in our way. >> do you agree with that assessment? are their pockets for the u.s. takes law enforcement? >> the
issue on the minds of americans. it's been that way since late 2007 when the u.s. economy went into a recession, and how do americans feel about which candidate is doing a better job on the economy right now? they were split going into the first debate. we'll take a look at polling coming out that was conducted after the first debate. again, right there, can you see that number. that 48%, that really says it all. the economy is the most important issue on the minds of american voters, and what's the most important economic issue, jobs, randi? >> which is why there is so much heated debate about those most recent jobs numbers. paul, thank you very much. we added 114,000 jobs last month, look at the latest numbers when it comes to jobs in manufacturing. the industry lost 16,000 jobs. but manufacturing is an important industry for many swing states, especially along the rustbelt, including small times like goshen, indiana, where our ted rowlands gives us context to those numbers. >> reporter: this is in elk hart county, indiana, an area absolutely hammeringed during the recession,
with a fox news alert. former long time u.s. senator arlen specter has died. he was a major political figure in his home state as pennsylvania. his career spanning more than 40 years and two political parties. dying from complications of non-hodgkin's lymphoma at the age of 82. peter doocy looks back at his contributions to his country. >> reporter: we just heard from president obama. he released a statement that says, arlen specter was always a fighter stamping out corruption as a prosecutor in philadelphia to three decades of service in the senate. he was fiercely independent. never putting partying party or ideology ahead of who was made to serve. he served witness integrity for three decades. laura and i appreciate his contributions to america and grateful for many years of public service. we send our condolences to his wife, joan and the specter family. they tell us the long time senator died at 1139 this morning from complications of non-hodgkin's limb foam 35. service will be in pennsylvania. he served as a democrat and then a republican and then a democrat in the united states senate
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 449 (some duplicates have been removed)

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